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durbin of illinois. >> suarez: and we sit down with the head of the world bank, jim yong kim, about his new push to tackle extreme poverty around the globe. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: rescuers worked in wet weather today to find survivors amid the rubble from the fiery explosion at a texas fertilizer plant last night. late today, authorities acknowledged there were fatalities but declined to confirm how many. earlier estimates ranged from five to 15 though there were reports the toll would go much higher. the cause of the fire and explosion
clint? >> number one, i think as jim and i have discussed, the older brother was probably the primary influence. he influenced his younger brother. this 19-year-old man now has lost that influence. he's lost that decision-making ability on the part of his older brother, so he's on his own. look, for all we know right now, three different things. he's either hiding in one of these houses, he's under a house and maybe he's bled to death because he got shot in the ch e shootout, too, or he was able to escape. if law enforcement closes that net tighter, they get through every house and every apartment and he's not there, that's going to be a new time to consider what we're doing. did we miss him? did he get away? and we also have to consider motive on this which is most important, and, you know, sometimes we look at the simplest motive and it makes no sense to us because it's almost chaotic. and it may be that these two young men were simply trying in their own terrible way to bring attention to the chechnyan, vis-a-vis the timmy mcveigh type who said collateral damage. these are the thi
program, dr. jim walsh. have you done any studies as far as cost/benefit? because that's the other thing i'm concerned about, the ramping-up of security and the billions of dollars being spent. is it being spent with some benefit? >> yeah, it's a great question. i was in boston on 9/11 sitting in front of a camera like this talking about the challenges that day. and you know, i find myself years later in the same situation. and in that intervening time, we've spent a lot of money and a lot of time and effort trying to improve security and trying to train, prepare, implement rules that would make the country safer. and so i have two reactions to what you're saying. on the one hand it seems evident to me, as i've watched events unfold this week in boston, that we have learned. we are better at this than we were before. that's not to blame folks on 9/11. that was a different scale attack. it's the first time we dealt with it. any time you deal with something the first time you're not going to be very good at it. but it's clear that we're way better at this, way better prepared, and training a
with international security expert with the mit security studies program, dr. jim walsh. have you done any studies as far as cost/benefit? because that's the other thing i'm concerned about, the ramping-up of security and the billions of dollars being spent. is it being spent with some benefit? >> yeah, it's a great question. i was in boston on 9/11 sitting in front of a camera like this talking about the challenges that day. and you know, i find myself 12 years later in the same situation. and in that intervening time, we've spent a lot of money and a lot of time and effort trying to improve security and trying to train, prepare, implement rules that would make the country safer. and so i have two reactions to what you're saying. on the one hand it seems evident to me, as i've watched events unfold this week in boston, that we have learned. we are better at this than we were before. that's not to blame folks on 9/11. that was a different scale attack. it's the first time we dealt with it. any time you deal with something the first time you're not going to be very good at it. but it's clear that w
's turn back to the investigation and talk to jim walsh, an international security and terrorism expert at m.i.t. let's talk about law enforcement. what are they looking for now? how do they go about this investigation? take us through some of those steps? and within that, we have to start forming some theories. from what we know already, do you think that it is maybe an individual or probably a group and how do you go about figuring out, is this a foreign group or individual, or americans? >> yeah. those are big questions and there are a lot of them. let me start in the beginning and say in terms of the phase of the investigation, i think there are different parts and different parts of the government are handling different parts of the investigation. so obviously, the most important and immediate thing are those events and evidence that are near the attack. that are approximate to the attack. that includes the crime scene. that includes the material used in the bomb and the process of reconstructing what that bomb looked like. it is designed, the materials it used. the nature of the t
and jim cramer. >> good morning, jim. >> lots to talk about. we account talk about boston and the impact on the market. i would love to hear your view on the psychology there, but also coca cola there. goldman sachs, j&j, we had good numbers. >> coca-cola doesn't have to say anything positive and people absolutely lap it up as they've done for all of the consumer products company and everies single one whereas, goldman sachs they just put a single boilerplate line about what everybody knows which is the macro environment and you're supposed to throw the stock out. i think that is a mistake, and i think the book value is for real. j & j is blessed. he's making it better. j & j and coca-cola, andrew, after boston, hey, you what? i'm take them. it's after boston. boston signifies the psychological terror that people feel when they buy anything other than what's in the supermarket. >> we were talking, i think in the 6:00 hour about sort of is this going to be a major psychological shift that people have come out and says not only a huge tragedy, but it will change the way people think about
expore tore jim three times larger than old space. enough to showcase 600 exhibit autos did they have new stuff? >> yes. >> i think they used to have like sports. >> there are 150 new exhibits. some showcase the beauty of the bay. and there is of a gallery that focuses on life sciences and biology. christina is the is the cure rateor. >> we're tinkerers and makers and scientists. and you know when you mix this together to give us this new building this is what you get. and it's been fantastic. >> there are speeches from movers and shakers including mayor ed lee. and dan ashley but the day belonged to the children of the bay area. like 11-year-old cooper. >> how long will it take to you get around? >> i don't know. i don't think i'll be able to see everything today. >> this is not just for kids, thursday nights they have adult only only night. it's open until 10:00 as sit on wednesday so there still time to get down here to enjoy the new exploratorium. live in san francisco, along the embarcadero, abc 7 news. >> thank you and i hope everyone will take time to go check it out. >> yes. still
36 hours and there's no antidote. abc's jim avila has the breaking news. >> hazmat suited inspectors gathered evidence linked to a letter addressed to the president of the united states, another to a mississippi senator, federal sources tell abc news they've arrested a suspect from tupelo, mississippi. a scare that stopped mail delivery on capitol hill this week. >> all staff and other personnel are directed to avoid this area until further notice. >> reporter: the fear, ricin. easily made from castor beans, by would-be bioterrorists. >> if you ingest enough, it could be very damaging and it could kill you. >> reporter: two letters, one to president obama, another two roger wicker, showed initial positive results in field tests. the letters never reached the white house or capital. >> the mail sent here is screened and the tests are taken at remote sites to mitigate the risks. >> the first was stopped then miles from its target to capitol hill. the second letter to the white house was intercepted six and a half miles away on a military base on the outskirts of d.c. a third post offic
asked. i do have one nature requests. yesterday we had a briefing by jim clapper on the intelligence budget going forward and produced a chart, which basically showed the ongoing sequester budget and other i would ask if you could check within perhaps, it is chart number 11 in his presentation. give us a similar visual breakdown of what your budget looks like, including as we now know the sequester on an ongoing basis. if we don't do anything about it, what does it do? i found this information yesterday to be very important because it shows real cuts. not cuts to grow, the real teeming nations of the funds available and it would be helpful to the committee to see that data as the books over the next 10 years, you look at the direct is chart and you'll see what i'm saying. >> we will, senator. thank you. >> one other quick comment and i'm sure you fellas know this as well as i do. one of the first things is deferring maintenance. but deferring maintenance isn't saving. if they cause someone has to pay in the future and i'm sure you agree. >> we do agree. >> you actually end up paying
if he had anything. he led a terrific team. then asa. >> thank you, jim. for all societies behaved differently under stress. at those times, they may even take action that conflicts with their its central character and values. that is what we did here. we were under stress. we took actions that conflict with who we are. who we are called to be and who we have committed to be. then we spent about 10 years not being willing to face the truth about it. often by covering what happened with euphemisms and an awful lot of secrets. i believe our detainee task force is revealing where we strayed from our values by shining the light of investigation and analysis on the problem, in the hope the next time we are under that stress, we do not go down the day -- the same road. has been an honor to serve on this panel. >> thank you. >> just in terms of new things, everyone here discussed the general contents of the report, the most important thing. there are some new points raised in the reports discussion on the role of the international red cross, and the debate inside the organization. we had
back after this. and we ged dollars in points from sears to use on jim's mower... hold the phone! ...and points from the grill helped pay for my dress... now you're just pulling my leg. get this, sometimes points just show up in our account. get out of town! with points from shop your way, there are more ways to save than ever at sears. oh and this bracelet... i used points to get it for free. yeah, right. and i'm married to lorenzo lamas. hola. this is how to save. this is sears. for the things you can't wash, freshen them with febreze. ♪ because febreze doesn't just cover up odors... penetrates nto fa to elimite odors because febreze doesn't just cover up odors... es a l esen just another way febreze helps you breathe happy. because febreze doesn't just cover up odors... living with moderate to semeans living with pain.is it could also mean living with joint damage. humira, adalimumab, can help treat more than just the pain. for many adults, humira is clinically proven to help relieve pain and stop further joint damage. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, inclu
with these two, seems to be it happened here. >> i want to bring in jim walsh now. he's a professor at m.i.t. you know, your office, jim, is right next to where this went down last night as we were watching building 32 at that time, we had absolutely no idea -- no one had any idea that this would be linked to the two brothers of the boston marathon bombing. >>> what is it like on campus right now? it must have been a real shock. >> well, certainly, to put this into some context, i went to bed last night having learned from m.i.t. that a person who works where i work, was slain, and then i woke up this morning, one street over from watertown, massachusetts, the middle class suburb next to cambridge, across the river from boston, to the sound of helicopters and sirens and instructions to keep our doors locked. i have since traveled -- i'm not on campus now, i'm at a studio here in watertown, which is ground zero for the police outside. there are more than a dozen satellite trucks. as i was pulling up, they stopped my car. i let them do their business. they were going house-by-house, checking the sm
the fresh faced perky oscar winning actress we have seen on screen. she was driven by her husband jim pope when he was pulled over on suspicion of drunk driving. the state trooper conducted a field sobriety test on mr. totes in this sobriety test. witherspoon kept getting out. she yelled out a few things that are now more famous than any lines in her movies. the reports said she asked the trooper do you know my name? later said you are about to find out who i am. witherspoon was in new york sunday at the red carpet at the premiere of her new movie "mud." released a statement saying i clearly had one drink too many and i am deeply embarrassed about the things i said. it was definitely a scary situation and i was frightened for my husband but that's no excuse. i was disrespectful to the officer who was doing his job. monday her mother filled in for her in court. they have been filming a movie "the good lie." no one imaged the video people would be watching would be of the star being led into the atlanta city jail. >>> in the wake of her arrest reese witherspoon canceled a scheduled appearanc
. well i'll be a monkey's uncle. and we got a hundred dollars in points from sears to use on jim's mower... hold the phone! ...and points from the grill helped pay for my dress... now you're just pulling my leg. get this, sometimes points just show up in our account. get out of town! with points from shop your way, there are more ways to save than ever at sears. oh and this bracelet... i used points to get it for free. yeah, right. and i'm married to lorenzo lamas. hola. this is how to save. this is sears. >>> here's look at today's forecast in some cities toward country. new york, expect morning showers. nothing but sunshine in miami. rain in chicago, 55 degrees the high there. dallas, thunderstorms, and los angeles, sunshine, 74. >> and time now for a check of the national forecast. another major snowstorm is bringing up to 18 inches to wyoming and a foot to colorado as it moves into the upper midwest where a foot could fall by thursday. the same storm also brings the risk of severe thunderstorms in the region. expect scattered thunderstorms in tennessee, carolinas, and georgia, and th
three deaths. cnn's jim spellman is in peoria, illinois. >> good morning, christine. you can see the waters coming up here. this is not too unusual here but it's got about another two feet to go. so far these sandbag levees are holding. they hope that remains the case. from north dakota to indiana, to mississippi. flad watches and warning throughout the middle of the country as rain water from torrential spring storms barrels down rivers and streams. >> so far it's held. >> reporter: in peoria heights, katie eaten hopes these sandbags and this pump will protect her home from the rising illinois river. what's it like to know your home's at risk? >> it's scary. i've had family lose house to floods, so i mean i know what to expect. but it's -- it's scary. >> reporter: at the end of the block, neighbors gail and jerry knew their home would be the first to flood. they spent the last few days removing all their possessions knowing they would likely never move back into their home of 13 years. you were prepared, but what is it like to actually watch your home go under water? >> it's dev
writing. he has been questioned since yesterday. cnn international security analyst jim walsh is joining us with more on what's going on. one of the key questions, the weapons that they have, the weapons that eventually killed an m.i.t. police officer, seriously injured another local law enforcement officer. do we have any idea where they got those weapons? >> not yet. and i think that question also extends to the explosives, as well. but this is an investigation pursuing lots of lines of inquiry both foreign and domestic. i would have to guess, though, that rather than risk acquiring weapons and explosives from abroad, it's much more likely they were acquired domestically. >> these two guys apparently didn't have much money, but enough to buy explosives, pressure cookers, a rifle, long rifle according to the watertown police chief i spoke with. other weapons, as well. >> i'm sure they're already well into the suspect's computer files and financial records. we're getting a mixed picture because on the one hand, they seem to have had a modest style of living. on the other hand, there is t
are working around the clock in 12 hour shifts. days off are cancel. jim avila on how boston most celebrated event turned into a spectacle of blood and screaming. >> 2 hours after the winner crossed. 4 hours 9 minutes in the race amateur runners still filling boston street. 2 rapid fire explosions at the finish line. >> something just blew up. [ screaming]. >>reporter: turning the cherished boston marathon into what one hospital official calls a war zone. >> i crossed the 26 mile marker and i saw the first explosion happen and there was some commotion. i saw fire and smoke and i didn't know what it was and then from about me to where that gentlemen is standing over there i literally saw the garbage barrel explode. i saw the flash. fire. smok smoke. i just ran inside as fast as i koyshtion camera rolling from many angle as the force of the blast actually knocks over at least one of the marathoners. look again as the force of the blast actually knocks over at least one of the marathoners. most of the injuries, though, suffered by spectators who came to sell brit the finish. >> bomb w
. coming up, a closer look at the stocks on the move ahead of the opening bell. we'll check in with jim cramer coming up next when we return. revolutionizing an industry can be a tough act to follow, but at xerox we've embraced a new role. working behind the scenes to provide companies with services... like helping hr departments manage benefits and pensions for over 11 million employees. reducing document costs by up to 30%... and processing $421 billion dollars in accounts payables each year. helping thousands of companies simplify how work gets done. how's that for an encore? with xerox, you're ready for real business. >>> welcome back to "squawk box." jim cramer joins us fro the new york stock exchange. good to see you, my friend. i need to know two things from you. how do you feel about yahoo and marisa meyer and someone was comparing this to jcp. >> oh, please! >> i wanted to get your view and then i want to know what you think about bank of america. >> first of all, i like what meyer is doing. >> the big problem at yahoo is a big culture, and i also like the idea of no more jumpe
period. how about jim demint who helped marco rubio win his seat. he said, quote, after decades of empty promises congress similar similarly lacks credibility to keep its promises. after strategies and plans for enforcement years later he's not buying it, and he's basically saying, vote against this. so let's bring in our conservative expert noah rothman. how is this going on the conservative side? are they going to get another votes to pass it or is it going to be blocked? >> i have no idea what the congress is going to do just yet. we only begun the selling process. i would imagine the gang of eight wants this passed so badly. the republicans want a political victory and democrats want an immigration reform i think it will be passed in congress but i think it will be troubling to pass it by the conservatives to say the least. they have been doing great work by identifying problems that are in this proposal, and a lot of it has to do with the enforcement provisions only being implemented. as far as the process has been implemented, it can be tied up in the course has to be implemented
jim mcconville, who is there with our troops. we know historically, the chechens have had activity in afghanistan. but there doesn't seem to be any evidence of any threats on our soil here in the united states, from the chechens. this would be something new. and the question we will have to learn, as they review everything, including all the activities of these two brothers on the day of the marathon and since, is whether or not they had contact with anyone outside of the united states, any known jihaddists or terror groups. we did see them remove a computer today from the sister of the two brothers. perhaps there will be in -- will be some evidence there. one captured, in the hospital, having surgery right now. the younger of the two. one killed in a shootout with police that happened a day ago. and the question now, gregg, is whether or not they are connected. let's ask dr. walead farris, a fox news terrorism analyst. how important is it to find out what kecks they have, beyond each other? >> oh, very important because those connections are going to tell us two things. number 1,
name is jim rainey, more recently a political writer at "the l.a. times." the couple announcements, everyone should turn off their cell phones. probably turn them off, even if they're on vibrate. richard is particularly sensitive. is a cell phone goes off, he will hunt you down and correct it. after the session, there are going to be signing of the folks here about today and the signing area is area one, which you can look on a map where someone will direct you. you're also not opposed to record this. i'm going to introduce the three panelists, starting in the middle with jon wiener. john teaches at you see irvine and has contributed an editor to the nation agassi. he also is a weekly radio program wednesdays at 4:00 p.m. on 90.7 fm. he is best known for suing the fbi for their files on john lennon. that story was told in the book, give me some truth, the john lennon ei trials. his most recent book is how we forgot the cold war, historical journey across america, which you can pick up later and get signed to john. that is john in the middle. next we've got the brass who has a home
were introduced by senator diane and representative jim costa. those bills would add 1600 acres on the western border of the park. john argued for including that land more than a century ago but lost out to timber companies. they say the expansion would be paid for with life collected from offshore oil drilling. a solar powered is back in the skies over the bay area tonight preparing for cross country flight. the swiss made solar impulse is on a 16 hour test flight. flew over the golden gate bridge this afternoon. this is video of an earlier flight near the field. the plane is set to fly over the bay bridge within the next couple of hours. the solar impulse is considered to be the world east most advance plane its massive wings are covered with 12,000 solar cells abdomen that plane can fly all day and all night without liquid fuel. >> oracle has a new yacht on san francisco bay. it happened last october out on the bay. the wing on that $8 million boat was destroyed when the boat flipped over during a practice run. news chopper 2 flu over the florida san francisco today as it pla
will have one of the echo creators of jim chapin will be here to talk to read his new project. we will see you here tomorrow. "the willis report" as telling a next. ♪ gerri: hello, everybody. i'm gerri willis. tonight on "the willis report" budget cuts bite at airports across the country and passengers feel it. >> i got here and they said that the flight was canceled. gerri: the old adage, sell in may and go away, but how did you invest the right way this year? we will show you how. your boss snooping under facebook and twitter. are your privacy rights gone for good? we are on the case tonight on "the willis report." ♪ gerri: tonight's top story, delays at airports coast to coast. according to the faa, flights into new york, baltimore, and washington are delayed because of not enough controllers on hand to monitor the busy corridors. joining me now, president of boy group international and erik hanson, director of domestic policy for the u.s. travel association. welcome to you both. i will start with you, mike. what do you make of this? the fda is saying many of these delays are two ho
and expert jim walsh. good to have you here. >> good to be with you. >> first of all, have you ever seen anything like this in a major metropolitan city in america? >> first of all, i've never seen anything like it at all. and in particular how it is touching various parts of my life. yesterday i taught my class at m.i.t. from 1:00 to 3:00, you know, hung out at my office, made my way home, only to see on the news that two blocks from my office a person who workeds for the same place i do, m.i.t., had been assassinated. i woke up this morning, to the sound of helicopters. i live -- i live on the watertown border. i woke up, my phone is ringing off the hook, i drive to watertown. blocks from where a reporter is, that's where my studio is. and streets are blocked off. the streets are empty. there were national guard, tactical police, state police, lots of media satellite trucks, i go into the studio like i always do and lock the door, right, because we're all on lockdown now. and then began to talk to your colleagues and then i received a phone call from my daughter. and my daughter who gr
this morning with more rain sadly in the forecast. i feel terrible saying that. cnn's jim spellman is in one of those towns. he's in peoria, illinois. jim, people there are looking at water levels, i understand, that haven't been this high in more than 60 years. >> since the 1940s since the illinois river here in peoria came up this high. but it's not just peoria. rivers across the midwest are flooding. from north dakota to indiana to mississippi, flood watches and warnings throughout the middle of the country, as rainwater from torrential spring storms barrels down rivers and streams. >> so far it's held. >> reporter: in peoria heights, katie eaten hopes these sandbags and this pump will protect her home from the risele illinois river. what's it like to know your home's at risk? >> it's scary. i've had family lose house to floods, so i mean i know what to expect. but it's -- it's scary. >> reporter: at the end of the block, neighbors gail and jerry knew their home would be the first to flood. they spent the last few days removing all their possessions knowing they would likely never move ba
. and we got a hundred dollars in points from sears to use on jim's mower... hold the phone! ...and points from the grill helped pay for my dress... now you're just pulling my leg. get this, sometimes points just show up in our account. get out of town! with points from shop your way, there are more ways to save than ever at sears. oh and this bracelet... i used points to get it for free. yeah, right. and i'm married to lorenzo lamas. hola. this is how to save. this is sears. see lioutdoors, or in.ight. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it meant to be seen. maybe even a little better. visit your eyecare professional today to ask about our newest lenses, transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is best for you. don't blame him. instead, rely on frontline plus. it kills adult fleas and ticks, plus flea eggs and larvae, destroying future generations. ask your vet about frontline plus. >> this is an abc seven news update. >> the morning, i am greta kr
now. u.s. remember at the beginning of the iraq war, jim asked me a question, does this still hold true today? do movie stars need be afraid to speak out? and i would say, yes. the lesson is, if what you care about is your pocketbook, if you want to speak out and be pro patriotic and defend america right or wrong, you'll never get in trouble. if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you belief, as a citizen -- remember, we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everybody, at least from the beginning, white, male, 2 1, with property, could vote. since then we've expanded -- well, i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who was sovereign, that we were sovereign. the american revolution declared the people sovereign rather than a king or queen. you couldn't have a king or queen taking your land away because they had finch it to you through sovereign rights. so if every citizen has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government, we would think we could respect that, and yet at the very begi
force discussed their findings on >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important report. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese- americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post- 9/11 environment. were's some key questions wanted to address this morning. one is the treatment
. and welcome to both of you. >> thank you. >> brown: jim jones, indisputable that the united states practiced torture. at the time the justice department said otherwise, that within very strict rules this was not torture. what made you say this was? >> well, an exhaustive study of the laws of court cases, of the practice, of interviews and the summary of all of it was it was indisputable there was torture in many cases. >> brown: just to be clear: you didn't have subpoena power here and so how were you doing it? you said by talking to people? >> well, the staff and some of the panel members visited several countries, visited the black sites where some of these were in poland, lithuania, et cetera, they talked to officials, they talked to detainees themselves, and they did an exhaustive research of the law and the united states has even brought prosecutions for the very same things that we did in some of those sites. >> brown: david irvine, former u.s. ambassador john bolton told the kwra +*eup that "this report is completely divorced from reality." the procedures were in his words "lawyered a
for the markets and today, more big swings, michelle. >> let's break it down. joining us is jim mcdonald from northern trust global investments. this week, overall, so far, looks pretty negative. you went into the year very positive. you still positive, despite these two big sell-offs this week? >> we are. i think what's happened today, for example, we've gotten a one-two punch over concerns between european credit and also some worries about the global growth environment. we think we may have a little bit of a pause here, but we're going to see continued growth through the year. it will be rewarded by take risk in the stock market. >> why? >> because with growth keeping up and inflation being under control, monetary policy is going to stay very easy, and we see that as being something that's going to lead to equity returns being positive. >> you have to admit, we've had a very good first quarter, 10% gains for most of the averages, 15% at the most extreme. aren't we due for a correction of some kind? >> well, we could absolutely have a pause here and a small correction wouldn't be off the re
in trying to find these potential suspects and whittle down the information? >> piggyback what jim said, the tremendous amount of information. it's really hard to conceptualize how much is going on, how many streams of information are coming in. big part of it right now, of course, lining up witnesses with all the data that's available. digital and analog. and identifying people, timeline, sequences. who was here, egress routes? as far as facial recognition system, i've been out of the government now for about 18 months, and before that, there were huge leaps in technology and biometrics and facial recognition system. i can imagine now the state-of-the art is that much further along. i'm sure it will be a big part in helping identify. >> when we talk about this mounds and mounds of evidence, it's really two different crime scenes essentially. we had two bomb sites. are they treating each of these independently or look for commonalities between the two? >> absolutely on the commonalities. think of it in terms of one major crime scene, death scene here, with some of the best technicians i
away with it. they were not expecting this to happen within a couple of days. >> final question, jim, for the moment. the individual, the youngest brother, dzhokhar, he, as we know, is on the loose. the police believe that they have him in a contained area. how does this end? i mean, obviously he's a font of information alive, but how does it end? >> well, he could be dead. you know, there's a report there was blood found and he may have been wounded in the huge shootout with the police, 200 rounds are fired. he could have been wounded and he could be dead under one of those houses or in garage back there. so he could have bled out. that's one possibility. he could have killed himself is another possibility. he could be hiding there with a bomb strapped on him that he may detonate when the agents and detectives and police surround him. or he may surrender. so that's -- or try to get through to cordon. that's about his options right there, and that's about how it will play out. we'll see in the ensuing hours. you know, we knew when the pictures were put out that before the sun rose at
. at the same time, and we were talking about this, jim and i, before the battle began. the same thing happened with yosemite. you have to believe that this place for your putting a marker down in discovering was absolutely pristine. no one had ever lived there. it was too inaccessible. so flattering to the gills of these men that they could brave that terrifying wilderness. but it was based on the fiction. >> and that fiction in both cases is that the native americans had never lived there and in the case of yellowstone the fiction on with the park and the idea of the park continued to be based well into the 20th-century was that the indians had been so eager and superstitious that they had been terrified of the place. in fact, go into the historical record and they were in and out all the time. hunting, sending out were parties. it would crisscross the from the with the buffalo grove seasonally. it would go into a sitting kraft tech kraft arrowheads. that of sitting cliff functioned as a demilitarized zone. and they went there for six reasons. in many cases their records of various tied to a
-americans and other people of color in the jim crow not just south of the north to map. >> in my book i talk about confronting and discussing with the president of "msnbc" in 2010 about pat buchanan and him being on that channel and saying you have a guy who is essentially friendly with white separatist, friendly with white supremacists. he has written a book that says america's diversity is its downfall. why is this guy in your channel? he said zero code you know he has a point of view that we should feature. ..
unemployed during the great depression, and you had jim crow where it was legal and de facto segregation. you didn't find the same kind of criminality. we have spent $16 trillion since 1965 on poverty, and what we've done is we've destabilized families. that is why when a kid sees a gang banger, as you mentioned, he looks at that gang banger and thinks, hey, this is what i want to be. he doesn't have a father to say, wait a second, this is not the way to go. hit the books two good, hard hours a day. finish high school, don't have a kid before you're 20 years old and get married before you have that kid. if you do that, you will not be poor. the question we have to ask ourselves is, what policies are we doing that are giving people the incentive or disincentive to follow that formula? >> host: larry elder, a conversation between you and your mother beginning with your mother. your mother thought -- your father thought small. don't make the same mistake. that's unfair. oh, here you go again, defending him. he's not donald trump. he was a wimp, she said. >> guest: yeah. my mother -- she was in a
reform was being debated former senator jim demint from south carolina told his colleagues the need to vote against obama cared cared we need to break the obama administration. senator mcconnell for senate majority leader from the republicans announcing in 2010 that his highest priority, the senate majority leader was making barack obama the one-term president. if we had a coalition presidency were each party would elect a partner it wouldn't stand to gain as much clinical opposition. no matter what they did it was still share the white house with the other party so then it would be much freer to judge legislative proposals on their merits. so to put it another way, it's not surprising when you have a winner-take-all election for presidency whose power has grown to a level of the presidency you shouldn't be surprised that we have high levels of partisan conflict. indeed if you go back the increase in partisan conflict, to go back to the 50s and 60's there is much more of a cross party lines. if you look at partisan conflict graph it has risen since the 40s in the 50s grassley to lev
completely agree. one of the close i found i especially really like was from a former congressman jim kline and he said it's a little hard to believe that your nonfiction book you can't put down. and i thought that it was especially appropriate because if you like this book, it's different from a lot of nonfiction work that i've read. and that it really does read like a thriller. it really does, it takes these little discussions, and jack should manatee, humanity side to it. >> guest: we like to think it's an important book in the sense that it tells you how the court works. there are so few good books out there that explains what's the process, how do they go about this, how do they decide these cases, what are they saying to one another? we see these cases that split the court five before. what do they think? to the personal this get into it? so it's about not just about capital punishment. it's a book about how the court operates. >> guest: when he did get into those in the library of congress, the memorandum, the notes back and forth between the justices that are available him and a lot
jihadist. we'll show you that video and ask our security analyst jim walsh what all of this means. we had never used a contractor before and didn't know where to start. at angie's list, you'll find reviews on everything from home repair to healthcare written by people just like you. no company can pay to be on angie's list, so you can trust what you're reading. angie's list is like having thousands of close neighbors where i can go ask for personal recommendations. that's the idea. before you have any work done, check angie's list. from roofers to plumbers to dentists and more, angie's list -- reviews you can trust. i love you, angie. sorry, honey. twenty-five thousand mornings, give or take, is all we humans get. we spend them on treadmills. we spend them in traffic. and if we get lucky, really lucky, it dawns on us to go spend them in a world where a simple sunrise can still be magic. twenty-five thousand mornings. make sure some of them are pure michigan. your trip begins at michigan.org. yeah, i'm looking to save, but i'm not sure which policy is right for me. you should try our cover
f. kennedy. you're here at history, the cold war, hollywood and beyond. and i'm jim rain yes. i am a media writer and more recently political writer "los angeles times." i want to make a first announcement. first, everybody turn all your cell phones. just turn them off. even if they're on vibrate. richard is particularly sensitive. he won't like that if a cell phone goes off, he will hunt you down and he will correct it. after the session, like after most of our sessions here, there are going to be signings of the books you're going to hear about today. and the signing area is area one, which you can look on a map or someone out here can direct you. so, that's all. you're also not supposed to record this. i'm going to introduce our three panelists, starting in the middle with jon wiener. jon teaches history at the ic irvine, he host as weekly radio program, wednesdays at 4:00 p.m. on kpfk, 90.7fm. guest moan for suing the fbi for their files on john lennon. that story was told in the book, give me some truth, the john lennon fbi files. his most recent book is how we forget the cold
jim harbaugh at stadium preview event. the new stadium will cost $1.2 billion when all is said and done. >>> your time is 6:07. there will soon be more options if you ride the ferry between south san francisco and the east bay. starting next monday, they are adding a 6:20 p.m. trip. right now the last ferry leaves at 5:20. now ridership has been down so the ferry operators are hoping that adding more evening trips will attract more commuters. they also hope to attract more tourists and school trips. >>> we are looking at the bridge pam and dave. and westbound bay bridge is becoming more crowded as you come up to the pay gates. even though the metering lights are not on. that is why you have that big empty spot there for the fast track. but once they turn the metering lights on at 6:15 that empty spot will go away. looking at the san mateo bridge it looks pretty good. there was a car fire westbound 92 near industrial. it's on the shoulder. could cause slow traffic on the way to the san mateo bridge. this morning if you are driving on 92 over to 101 traffic there looks good. 6:08
joking that jim demint should run for president. this isn't exactly what i had in mind. [laughter] perhaps he misunderstood me. you know, the ting that makes jim -- the thing that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like matt spaulding and the heritage foundation itself so valuable; that is, your shared insistence on making the positive case on conservativism, what conservatives are for. in washington it's common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats stand opposed to each other, obviously, in outspoken partisanship is what almost always gets the most headlines. this negativity is unappealing on both sides, and that helps explain why the federal government is increasingly held in such low regard by the american people. but for the left the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose today is to defend its past gains from conservative reform. but negativity on the right, to my mind, makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative that liberals are for things, and conse
it and start over, not expand it bret? >> bret: all right, jim. thank you. the treasury department says the internal revenue service the irs overpaid up to $13.6 billion in tax credits designed for low income families last year. the report finds the irs in violation of requirements that it set and meet payment reduction targets that it set and meet payment reduction targets. still ahead, emotions come to the surface over boston and immigration reform. first after a week of domestic turmoil, the president turns his focus to international turmoil. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. happening in that department. >> while the president responded to domestic terrorism in boston last week and monitored the search for suspects,
they couldn't possibly win. something like watergate happens. they're in for life. tom foley. jim howard of new jersey. these guys and women have the guts to run an impossible -- that's what's so inspiring about it. she could be a congresswoman for life in the wrong district. in other words, politically she's probably too moderate. your thoughts? >> one of the reasons the republican campaign committee must be just tearing its hair out is that this was another race that republicans have essentially given away because they have a bad candidate. it's like todd akin in missouri. these are races republicans should have won. but they have bad candidates. at first the campaign committee was going to go ahead with it, give mark sanford money. he's at least well known. he served as governor twice. he's got the politics that seem to fit that district. but he's also an idiot. and let me say this in his wife's defense. remember that mark sanford came to her to ask her to run his campaign this time around. after publicly humiliating her with another woman. so for all of his alleged political genius,
promise to find it just for you right here on "mad money." i'm jim cramer. thank you, everybody. see you tomorrow! >>> good evening, everyone. i'm larry kudlow. this is "the kudlow report." let's get started right away. the big story today a shocking but fake tweet and from the associated press and set off a steep stock market selloff and then just as suddenly, a stock market rebound. what on earth happened? cnbc's own eamon javers joins us with this incredible story. good evening. >> it was a really bizarre turn of events starting at 1:07:00 p.m. here's the tweet that the a.p. account put out at that minute. it said, "breaking" two explosions in the white house and barack obama is injured. that was a fake report as a result of a hack attack against the a.p. twitter account. but it set off this reaction in the dow jones industrial average, as you see from the chart, a huge spike down on that news. down about 143 points at the bottom. and then bouncing right back up, all of that happening within the space of about three minutes. and by sheer coincidence, the white house briefing was set t
in suburbia." see you tomorrow. >>> i'm jim cramer and welcome the my world. >> you need to get into the game. >> and firms are going to go out of business and they are nuts, they are nuts, they know nothing. >> i always like to say there is a bull market somewhere and "mad money," you can't afford the miss it. hey, i'm cramer and welcome to cramerica. some people want to entertain you, but my job is to educate you.
of call, and that diamond is the bomber. >> jim cavanagh, thank you so much for that. well, we could find out definitively today if letters sent to president obama and senator roger wicker contain the poison ricin. mississippi police have arrested 45-year-old paul kevin curtis at his home. the fbi says curtis sent three letters, all of which preliminarily tested positive for ricin, and included a final line that red, "i am kc, and i approve this message." 'one size fits all'. it doesn't. that's crazy. we're all totally different. ishares core. etf building blocks for your personalized portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus, which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. accomplishing even little things can become major victories. i'm phil mickelson, pro golfer. when i was diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis, my rheumatologist prescribed enbrel for my pain and stiffnes
's jim acosta just recently spoke to vice president joe biden. let's briefly check in with him. jim, what did the vice president say? >> we caught up with vice president joe biden as he was heading into an event to honor former congressional staffer gabe zimmerman, the staffer gunned down in the shooting that also wounded former congressman gabrielle giffords in tucson. that event is going on now. the vice president is speaking right now. as he was heading into that event, we threw a quick question at mr. biden about the events up in boston, what, if anything, he knows about the investigation. and he acknowledged that the government at this point doesn't have any hard information as he called it in this case. here is what he had to say. >> mr. vice president, any comment on what is happening in boston right now? >> we're going to get to the bottom of this. we don't have any hard information yet, but i can assure you we will find out who did it and bring them to justice. >> no sense as to whether this is domestic or foreign-based. >> not yet. >> and you can hear there as the vice president
a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning that we want to hit some of the highlights. we hope he will take the entire report, study it through and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i looked back in history to the time during world war ii that we in turn to some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do but in light of history, it was an error. as of today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post 9/11 environment. there are some key questions we wanted to address this morning. one, did the treatment of suspected terrorists and u.s. custody rise to the left of torture? second how did this happen and what can we learn from this to make better decisions to the future. we found the u.s. personnel in many instances used interrogation techniques on detainee's that constitute torture. american
30 victims who were missing a limb. abc's jim avila reports on how this tragedy unfolded. >> reporter: two hours after the winners crossed, 4:09 into the race, the amateur runners still filling boston's boylston street, two rapid-fire explosions at the finish line. >> something just blew up! [ explosion ] >> run! go! >> reporter: turning the cherished boston marathon into what one hospital official called a war zone. >> i crossed the 26-mile marker and i saw the first explosion happen. there was some commotion. i saw a fire and smoke. and i didn't know what it was. and then from about me to where that gentleman is standing over there, i literally saw the garbage barrel explode. i saw the flash, the fire, the smoke, and i just ran as fast as i could. >> reporter: cameras were rolling from many angles as the force of the blast actually knocks over at least within of the marathoners. look again. most of the injuries, though, suffered by spectators who came to celebrate the finish. >> a bomb went off. and it knocked me to the ground. and then, you know, everybody started running, panickin
of the task force discussed their findings on wednesday at the national press lub. >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important eport. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the sandrite proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions we
gifford has an op ed this morning. jim is a republican. what you think about what the senate did? we havehere in delaware plenty of gun laws. sure that is the case in a lot places in the country where somebody gets arrested with a gun crime, usually they are able to eliminate that. they do not prosecute for illegal guns. there are plenty of guns laws already. it is just a matter of having the prosecutors have in the nerve to enforce these laws. this is just another attempt by the federal government to disarm the people of the united states and it is not going to make any favorites. lot of this is a distraction from the economy and the fact they refuse to do anything to cut back on the sides of the government. host: are you a gun owner? caller: i do not own a gun but pretty much everyone else i know owns a gun. -- here ins castle new castle, a lot of people did not have guns. guns start leaking out towards this area. people are very open a round here about gun under ship. about gun ownership. are there any further regulations you would support on gun buying? isler: no, i just think it
thing in the world can happen to a city and dumb sportscasters will go, three hours, jim, this city forget there was a nuclear blast. >> something different was going on there. >> here, it can only happen in boston because boston is a one sports team town. at the end of the day, the sox that pull the entire team together. >> fenway. >> and fenway, the cathedral to a city. it had to be an amazing day there. >> it was. it was an amazingly emotional afternoon. it was a cathartic moment. a baseball game happened to have been played but it was if a tiny basilica on the back bay and the region was attracted to it. the suspected suspect had been successfully captured the evening before. neil diamond called the red sox switchboard. >> are you kidding me? >> called the red sox switchboard and said i'm in town, my name is neil diamond. i'd like to come and sing the song and he showed up. >> wow. >> to the surprise -- >> which, of course, people are watching that don't know, that's been a tradition. >> yeah, for a long, long time, many years. middle of the eighth inning, they sing it. >> it's
that i served in the senate choking or half joking that jim demint should run for president. this is not exactly what i had in mind. perhaps he misunderstood me. the thing that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like max balding and the heritage foundation so valuable. you are sharing assistance on making a positive case for conservatives, what conservatives are for. in washington is common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats are opposed to each other in an outspoken partisanship. it is what almost gets the most headlines. this negativity is not appealing on both sides. that helps explain why the government is increasingly held in such beauregard by the american people. for the left, the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose is to defend its past gains from conservative reform. negativity on the right to my mind makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative liberals are for things and conservatives are against things. when we concede this narrative w
the changes of the way it operates. but as jim said if you change medicare you're likely to have ripple effects that could be very positive for the rest of the health sector. the question is, can you get >> of course, that does say that it is not a fortune teller or an accurate one in the projections are faulty but in fact, the program has then better with per-capita prescription drug spending than the rest of the country. that is a good indication. and two seniors make a choice is? this is a fear everyone has. so here i go to part d again. what a lot of analysts who don't like the idea have said is i . >> is an exciting time. population reasserting is growing at a tremendous pace as baby boomers aged to there golden years we're at an important evolution. these leading-edge consumers and represent the beginning of the epic wave of growth has statistics were mentioned at the end of the decade, a 64 million people will be enrolled in medicare. 40 million more or 28% more than today. and also the population will look differently as the boomers age because of there unique qualities and char
joking that jim demint should run for president. this is not exactly what i had in mind. perhaps he misunderstood me. the thing that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like mike spaulding and the heritage foundation so valuable. you are sharing assistance on making a positive case for conservatives, what conservatives are for. in washington it is common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats are opposed to each other in an outspoken partisanship. it is what almost gets the most headlines. this negativity is not appealing on both sides. the helps explain why government is increasingly held in such low regard by the american people. for the left, the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose is to defend its past gains from conservative reform. negativity on the right to my mind makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative. liberals are for things and conservatives are against things. when we concede this narrative, we concede the debate before the debate begins. ye
agricultural. thank you all very very much for being here. megan smith, jim kolbe and judson please come forward. we are going to go straight through the noon hour because of the numbers we have. some senators have been thinking of going in for lunch and other meetings that are taking place but we will begin with megan smith who is commissioner of the vermont commission of tourism appointed by -- in 2011. before that she was in the vermont legislature and before she became commissioner she and her husband owned and operated the vermont in which is a very nice place. for over a dozen years. ms. smith, go ahead. >> chairman lacie ranking member grassley members of the committee i'm pleased to be here today on behalf of the vermont department of tourism and marketing and the broader traveling community to highlight the importance of travel related provisions included in immigration reform. vermont is very dependent on tourism. our percentage of jobs in the industry is twice the natural -- national average of 38%. the majority of our businesses are small and family-owned and agri-tourism is
in the united states senate joking or perhaps half joking that jim demint should run for president. this isn't exactly what i had in mind. [laughter] perhaps he misunderstood me. you know, the ting that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like matt spalding and the heritage foundation itself so very valuable; that is, your shared insistence on making the positive case for conservativism, what conservatives are for. in washington it's common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats stand opposed to each other, obviously, and outspoken partisanship almost always gets the most headlines. this negativity is unappealing on pote sides, and that helps explain why the federal government is increasingly held in such low regard by the american people. but for the left the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose today is to defend itself past gains -- its past gains from conservative reform. but megativity on the right, to my mind, makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative that lib
's jim dickey has some answers. >> good morning, john, diana. tracking a cold front. pushing eastward, seeing soaking rainfall this morning across portions of the midwest. and snow in the ohio valley, and snow in the twin cities, into wisconsin. back on into denver. good news is the snow does wind down but not before many spots have picked up as much as 6 to 12 inches of snow, twin cities area up into canada. this is while we are seeing soaking rainfall here. many of the spots. river levels fall from record levels. flash flooding, major concern where the rain is falling. but all of the rain, all of the floodwater continues to filter down the mississippi. many spots southward still watching the rivers rise. widespread major flooding ongoing here through the week. john and diana, back to you. >> jim, thank you. >>> to boston now where top officials have kicked off fund raidsing. efforts for the victims of the marathon bombing. >> that's right. the one fund boston has already gotten $1 million commitment from the john hancock insurance company. you can see the number one prominently on t
your bank of america stock or selling it? here to discuss this, jim senegal, financial services analyst from "morningstar". thank you for joining us. what do you think of the report in the first place? banks manipulate the numbers for instance, moving loan-loss reserves over to the balance sheet. other banks have done that. can we believe numbers and are banks worse perhaps than we believe with bank of america? >> bank of america did release some reserves. that is something all the banks are doing. it is something i don't think a lot of investors look at. there is some help to the bottom line there. other than that it was a pretty clean quarter, asking considering all of the unusual charges for bank of america has had in the past few years. i think the problem is, the earnings really aren't anything to get excited about. even though bank of america's problems are receding into the past they're still not making a lot of money and a lot of that has to do with the macroeconomic environment. adam: when you talk about problems receding into the past, the big problem would be countrywide. i t
shrapnel designed to maim anyone standing by and jim avila has more. it's not hard to find out how to build one. >> reporter: it's not. investigators are learning more about the anatomy of the bombs and abc news confirming the common cooking appliance used in their construction was a midsize fager brand pressure cooker. unfortunately, the pot maker sells 50,000 a year of those in the united states. this is what remains of what investigators believe could be the crude but effective bomb used in boston. the american military knows them well. the pressure cooker bomb. homemade and designed to maim and kill. this video of military units detonating one in afghanistan posted on youtube. this one found on the internet from the streets of nepal. so common the department of defense handbook on spotting roadside bombs warns soldiers and marines to be on the lookout for that innocent pressure cooker and publications all over the internet teach the construction of a bomb made from mom's kitchen, why so popular? because pressure cookers seal so tightly and can be filled with nails and ball bearings and
of estimates as asian demand for its software dropped. still, in an interview with cnbc earlier, co-ceo jim hagueman sounded confident that growth in the asia pacific region was still solid. >> in asia, we have had now 13 consecutive quarters of double digit growth. 12, actually. this is the first time we have an issue in asia. what that means is you have an organization that has been growing rapidly. with that comes new demand on leadership. we have been make something changes. in q1 we had a couple of key countries where we were looking for the leadership to take this organization to the next level. that's why it's impacting q1. but if i look at the pipeline and the business out there, we have a very, very solid business also in asia pacific. >> they also said revenue from sap's cloud technology division was a bright spot in the report, jumping 380% from a year earlier. he responded to speculation the company might make its cloud service private, as well. >> we do see what cloud does for our customers is it radically simplifies complexity. running global supply chains is not ease or realt
.s. chief national correspondent jim angle tells us money, power and influence are on the line. >> experienced with terrorists here at home, the u.s. is trying to avoid encouraging them overseas, as secretary of state john kerry arrived in turkey where he plans to announce an increase in not only aid to the syrian rebels of up to $10 million. as he empty with syrian opposition leader, the memories of boston were still fresh on his mind. and he spread his sorrow. before offering more aid to syrian rebel, the u.s. wants assurances that any new government would be democratic and inclusive. in other words, not dominated by radical islamists as he explained to congress this week. >> obviously there are dangers of extremists who are finding some funding and engaged in the battle and we want to try to separate them, if that is possible. >> u.s. aid would include military items such as body armor, communications equipment, and night vision goggles. but not weapons or ammunition. syrian opposition groups were there to demand more help from the international community. they argue the as
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